The Danish Aliens Act amended: Higher pay limit and abolishment of green card

Back
Categories
HR News
Date:
15 Jun 2016

the danish parliament recently passed two bills to amend the danish aliens act with effect from 10 june. the amendments are relevant for employers looking to hire foreign nationals.

By:
Sara Baldus

The Danish Parliament recently passed two bills to amend the Danish Aliens Act with effect from 10 June. The amendments are relevant for employers looking to hire foreign nationals.

Non-EU nationals may obtain residence and work permit in Denmark under a number of schemes such ‎as the pay limit scheme, the positive list, the green card scheme, etc. This follows from the Danish ‎Aliens Act. The schemes are intended to make it relatively simple for employers to hire highly qualified ‎foreign nationals.‎

Now two private member's bills have been passed by the Danish Parliament and they have changed the ‎threshold of the pay limit scheme and abolished the green card scheme.‎

Pay limit scheme
So far, a residence and work permit has been available under the pay limit scheme if the foreign ‎national has received an offer of employment with a minimum annual pay of DKK 375,000 ( EUR ‎‎50,000). With the new amendments, the minimum annual pay limit is now DKK 400,000 ( EUR 54,000). ‎Under the former regime, the minimum annual pay was not adjusted on a regular basis, but this will ‎change now as the amount will be subject to annual adjustment to reflect the general wage trends in ‎Denmark.‎

The bill entered into force on 10 June, and applications submitted after that date must therefore comply ‎with the new monetary threshold.‎

Green card scheme
Since 2007, it has been possible for foreign nationals to obtain a residence and work permit for the ‎purpose of seeking employment in Denmark if the person in question had obtained at least 100 points ‎based on a points system primarily centred on educational background, linguistic skills and adaptability.‎

As a result of the bill, the green card scheme has been abolished with effect from 10 June.‎