Act on the Board of Equal Treatment amended

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Date:
22 Jun 2012

the revision of the danish board of equal treatment act has only resulted in few changes. the act was revised as part of the government's commitment to follow up on the activities of the board. the amendment will take effect on 1 july 2012

By:
Yvonne Frederiksen

The revision of the Danish Board of Equal Treatment Act has only resulted in few changes. The Act was revised as part of the Government's commitment to follow up on the activities of the Board. The amendment will take effect on 1 July 2012

The revision of the Danish Board of Equal Treatment Act has only resulted in few changes. The Act was ‎revised as part of the Government’s commitment to follow up on the activities of the Board. The ‎amendment will take effect on 1 July 2012.
 
In 2006, the then Danish Government abolished the Gender Equality Board and set up the Board of Equal ‎Treatment instead, giving it a broader jurisdiction than its predecessor. The Danish Parliament decided ‎at the time that the Board of Equal Treatment Act was to be revised in 2012.‎
 
In the Bill to revise the Act, the Danish Government concludes that the Board of Equal Treatment is ‎generally respected and meets expectations. As a result, only a few changes are made.‎
 
In future, the chairman of the Board of Equal Treatment will be a high court judge instead of a district ‎court judge. The reason given for the change is that the decisions of the Board may set precedents and ‎have significant effects on the labour market.‎
 
An established practice which is now incorporated into the Act is the procedure for dismissal of ‎complaints. In future, it will be specified in the Act that a complaint will be dismissed if the matter is not ‎suitable for being heard by the Board or if it is obvious that the Board will decide against the ‎complainant.‎
 
Finally, the Board will now also have jurisdiction to hear complaints about harassment under the Danish ‎Act on Equal Treatment of Men and Women – which means that its jurisdiction is extended to outside ‎the labour market.